College Football TV Listings 2018, Week 4

This is a list of every game played during week 4 of the 2018 college football season involving at least one FBS or FCS school. All games are listed, televised or not.

For the streamed/televised games (only live broadcasts are listed), I include the announcers and sideline reporters (where applicable). I put all of it on a Google Documents spreadsheet that can be accessed at the following link:

College Football TV Listings 2018, Week 4

 

Additional notes:

– I include games streamed by ESPN3.com, Fox Sports Go, and BTN2Go; they are denoted as “ESPN3”, “FS-Go”, and “BTN2Go”, respectively. This season, I will also list streamed games for NBC Live Extra, CBS Sports Digital, and WatchESPN.

– I also list digital network feeds provided by various conferences. For some of these feeds, the audio will be a simulcast of the home team’s radio broadcast. Other online platforms have their own announcers.

For now, the digital networks I am including in the listings are those for the ACCCAABig Sky (Pluto TV), Big SouthOVCSoConWCCNEC (Front Row), CUSAMountain West, and Patriot League (the last four of those being on the Stadium platform).

Occasionally individual schools (almost always at the FCS level) provide video feeds. When that is the case, I list those as well.

– This year, thanks mostly to the proliferation of ESPN+ games, I am including pay-per-view telecasts and streams. These matchups are sometimes listed as “PPV” telecasts or (in the case of feeds from individual schools) “All-Access” streams, though an occasional stream with that description is actually free.

– The local affiliates for the ACC Network “national” game of the week can be found on a link in the document, and here:  Pittsburgh-North Carolina

– The regional sports networks carrying the ACC Network “regional” game of the week can be found on a link in the document, and here:  Louisville-Virginia

– The regional sports networks carrying FSN games can be found in a note in the document, and here:  Akron-Iowa State

– Links to games carried on the Stadium platform can be found in notes in the document, and here:  Lafayette-Colgate, Central Connecticut State-Fordham, Dartmouth-Holy Cross, Illinois State-Colorado State, Columbia-Georgetown

– Links to games streamed on Facebook can be found in notes in the document, and here:  Central Connecticut State-Fordham, Columbia-Georgetown, Davidson-Dayton

– ESPN College Extra games:  Pittsburgh-North Carolina (blackout map), Louisville-Virginia (blackout map), Robert Morris-Bryant, Hampton-Northern Iowa, McNeese State-BYU, North Texas-Liberty, Alabama State-Grambling State, Southeastern Louisiana-Lamar, Furman-East Tennessee State, South Alabama-Memphis

– BTN (formerly Big Ten Network) “gamefinder”:  Link

– AP Poll (FBS):  Link

– AFCA Coaches’ Poll (FCS):  Link

A lot of the information I used in putting this together came courtesy of Matt Sarzyniak’s staggeringly comprehensive and simply indispensable site College Sports on TV, a must-bookmark for any fan of college football and/or basketball. It is also well worth following the weekly schedule put together by lsufootball.net, particularly for devotees of the central time zone.

As always, I must mention the relentless information gatherers (and in some cases sports-TV savants) at the506.com. I am also assisted on occasion by helpful athletic media relations officials at various schools and conferences.

College Football 2017, Week 8: the top 15 matchups

An explanation of this post:

On his college hoops ratings website, Ken Pomeroy has an algorithm called ‘FanMatch’, in which “games are rated for competitiveness and level of play with a lean towards higher-scoring games”. It is a way to rate the potential watchability of various basketball contests. There is just a touch of whimsy involved, which makes it even better…

Borrowing this idea, I’ve created a utterly byzantine and truly enigmatic formula to produce game ratings; it is called “Tingle Factor”, or TF. The higher the TF, the better.

To access a Google Document that has a complete schedule of televised/streamed D-1 college football games (including all the announcing teams), see this post: Link

I am excluding the game between The Citadel and Chattanooga this week, as that matchup looms over the rest of the slate to such an enormous degree that comparing it to the other games on the schedule is a wasted exercise.

Outside of that contest, here are the top 15 games for Week 7 that will take place on Saturday:

Road Team Home Team Gametime (ET) TV/Streaming TF
Southern California Notre Dame 7:30 PM NBC 83.6
Oklahoma State Texas 12:00 PM ABC/ESPN3 82.9
Michigan Penn State 7:30 PM ABC/ESPN3 82.8
UCF Navy 3:30 PM CBS Sports Network 79.5
Iowa State Texas Tech 12:00 PM FS1/FS-Go 77.2
Louisville Florida State 12:00 PM ESPN 70.8
North Texas FAU 5:00 PM ESPN3 69.5
Wake Forest Georgia Tech 7:30 PM ESPNU 69.4
LSU Mississippi 7:15 PM ESPN 69.2
Arizona California 8:00 PM Pac-12 Network 68.6
Iowa Northwestern 12:00 PM ESPN2 66.5
USF Tulane 7:00 PM ESPN2 64.9
Eastern Washington Southern Utah 7:00 PM Eleven Sports 64.7
Oregon UCLA 4:00 PM Pac-12 Network 64.6
Oklahoma Kansas State 4:00 PM FOX/FS-Go 64.1

 

Additional notes and observations:

– Southern California-Notre Dame will also be streamed on NBC Live Extra.

– CBS/CBS Sports Network games will also be streamed on CBS Sports Digital.

– The games on the ESPN “Family of Networks” will also be streamed via WatchESPN.

– Arizona-California and Oregon-UCLA will both be streamed on the Pac-12 Digital Network.

– The one FCS game to break into the top 15 this week, Eastern Washington-Southern Utah, will also be streamed on the Big Sky Digital Network.

– Of the fifteen highest-rated “TF” games on the board this week, Iowa State-Texas Tech (over/under of 68) is projected to be the highest-scoring. Other potential scorefests in the top 15 include Oregon-UCLA (over/under of 67.5), Eastern Washington-Southern Utah (66.5) and North Texas-FAU (66).

– The classic intersectional matchup between Southern California and Notre Dame has often been a bit streaky, but the two programs have split the last eight meetings. This is the 40th anniversary of one of the wilder team entrances in series history, the green jerseys/Trojan horse lunacy of 1977.

– Oklahoma State had a yards/play margin of +5.8 against Baylor, the largest such margin in any FBS game last week.

– Iowa State’s 20.5 yard field position margin advantage over Kansas was the biggest differential in that category for any FBS game last week.

– Arizona and California both ranked in the top 5 in “turnover luck” last week (the Golden Bears were #1 in that category). They play each other this week, so something has to give.

– Oregon has won six straight games against UCLA, including the 2011 Pac-12 title game. The Ducks have averaged 41.3 points per game over that stretch. Meanwhile, the average score of UCLA’s games this season is Opponent 40.5, Bruins 39.5.

– Eastern Washington’s last to trips to Cedar City, Utah have been adventurous. In 2014, the Eagles (then ranked 2nd in FCS) had to rally for a 42-30 victory. Two years before, the homestanding Thunderbirds upended a top-ranked EWU squad 30-27.

– USF is 6-0 for only the second time in program history. In 2007 the Bulls were ranked #2 in the country after six games, but USF lost its seventh game that season at Rutgers, 30-27.

– UCF is 5-0 for only the second time in program history, and the first time as an FBS team. The Knights have never started a season 6-0. Saturday’s game at Annapolis, a meeting between two teams with a combined record of 10-1, is the first time UCF has ever faced one of the service academies.

– Louisville and Florida State have met on the gridiron seventeen times, with the Seminoles winning fourteen of those contests. Before the Cardinals’ staggering 63-20 triumph over FSU last year (which catapulted Lamar Jackson to favored status for the Heisman Trophy, which he eventually won), Louisville’s previous largest margin of victory versus Florida State came in the first meeting in the series, a 41-14 decision in 1952.

The next season, Florida State beat Louisville 59-0.

– Wake Forest and Georgia Tech are playing for only the third time in the last ten years. Georgia Tech has won both of the most recent meetings, but the matchup before that came in the 2006 ACC title game, won by the Demon Deacons, 9-6. Sam Swank’s three field goals were all the scoring Wake Forest would need that afternoon.

– The most famous game in the history of the LSU-Mississippi series is, without question, the 1959 meeting. LSU was ranked #1; Mississippi, #3. The two teams had combined to allow only two touchdowns all season prior to the October 31 matchup. The Tigers won 7-3 on a legendary punt return touchdown by Billy Cannon, who subsequently won that year’s Heisman Trophy.

It should be a great day of college football. The primetime block of games looks particularly appetizing. Get all your chores done in the morning, grab your snacks, and spend the rest of the day and night on the couch…

Game review, 2013: Furman

I’m sure there is going to be plenty said and written over the next few days after this game. I don’t think many people thought the Bulldogs would be in a position of just playing out the string before the month of September was even over, but that’s basically how things stand.

The goals of a possible league title and/or playoff berth are essentially unreachable. A winning season (always appreciated by Bulldog fans) is probably not realistic either, particularly given the standard of play over the first month of the campaign.

I’ll write more about this game and some of the short-term and long-term issues with the football program later in the week. I first want to learn more about a couple of items, one of which is not directly related to the on-field miseries.

That would be Unigate. According to Jeff Hartsell:

The Bulldogs wore throwback jerseys with a big block “C” on the front during pre-game warmups, but had to change to their standard uniforms for the game. Citadel officials said the SoCon had approved the throwback uniforms, but word apparently did reach the game officials. They ruled that the numbers on the front of the throwback jerseys were too small.

If Southern Conference officials refused to let The Citadel wear uniforms approved by the Southern Conference office, that would probably be the most Southern Conference thing of all time. I would expect a telephone call from John Rosa to John Iamarino first thing Monday morning (if not sooner), with the commissioner doing a lot of apologizing.

If, however, the uniforms were not cleared by the league prior to Saturday’s game, that would probably not reflect well on certain officials at the military college.

I will say that I have my doubts that there was really a problem with the uniforms, given that I don’t think they were stylistically unique — adidas has made similar jerseys for Wisconsin, Nebraska, and Central Michigan. My initial instinct (which could be very wrong) is that the game officials were a bit too officious.

We’ll find out, hopefully sooner rather than later. It’s not completely unimportant. After all, the school website has been running an auction for “game-worn” throwback jerseys. Right now, they actually don’t have any throwback jerseys that have been worn during a game.

(I do wonder how jerseys with retired numbers on them can be game-worn, but that’s another issue.)

I’ll go ahead and write about one thing I noticed during the game. The first-down plays for The Citadel’s offense in the first half were as follows:

– Pass
– Robinson rush
– Pass
– Dupree rush
– Sack on would-be pass attempt
– Dupree rush
– Martin rush
– Dupree rush
– Stenson rush
– Robinson rush

That’s right. During the first half, on first down The Citadel ran more pass plays (or attempted pass plays) than handoffs to the running back who rushed for 227 yards against Old Dominion last week.

There was talk after the game about Furman putting nine players in the box. It seems to me, though, that the gameplan was already in place to throw the ball on first down.

Also, the Paladins may have stacked the line, but Robinson’s 1st-down carry in the first quarter was one of three consecutive carries for him, which wound up netting the Bulldogs a first down. Nine guys or not, he moved the chains.

That sequence was followed by another first-down pass attempt that fell incomplete and put The Citadel “behind schedule” again.

Incidentally, Robinson’s other rush on that first-down list came with 18 seconds to play in the first half. The Citadel then called timeout (a very curious maneuver), ran another play, then went to the locker room.

As usual, I took pictures. As usual, the best of them are only mediocre.

College Football TV Listings 2012, Week 4

This is a list of every game played during week 4 of the college football season involving at least one FBS or FCS school.  All games are listed, televised or not.  For the televised games (only live broadcasts are listed), I include the announcers and sideline reporters (where applicable).  I put all of it on a Google Documents spreadsheet that can be accessed at the following link:

College Football TV Listings 2012, Week 4

Additional notes:

– I include ESPN3.com games; they are denoted as “ESPN3″.

– I’ve listed the regional network affiliates for the SEC Network “national” game of the week (Kentucky-Florida) in a comment on the document.  There are numerous local affiliates, a listing of which can be found here:  Link

– The local affiliates for the ACC Network “national” game of the week (Army-Wake Forest) can be found here:  Link

– I’ve listed the regional nets carrying the SEC Network “regional” game (South Carolina State-Texas A&M) in a comment on the document.

– I’ve listed the regional nets carrying the ACC Network “regional” game of the week (Miami [FL]-Georgia Tech) in a comment on the document.

– The local affiliates for the Southland Conference Network game of the week (Sam Houston State-Central Arkansas) can be found here: Link

– Also listed on the document in a comment are the regional nets carrying the Mississippi-Tulane game.

– There are comments in the document with additional information for several other games.

– ABC/ESPN2 coverage map for the 3:30 pm ET games: Link

– BTN (formerly Big Ten Network) “gamefinder”:  Link

– USA Today Coaches Poll (FBS):  Link

– FCS Coaches’ Poll:  Link

A lot of the information I used in putting this together came courtesy of Matt Sarzyniak’s alarmingly comprehensive and completely indispensable website College Sports on TV, which cannot be lauded enough. It’s a must-bookmark for any fan of college sports, to say the least. Also to be credited, as always, are the indefatigable information gatherers (and in some cases sports-TV savants) at the 506.com.  I am also assisted on occasion by helpful athletic media relations officials at various schools and conferences.

A brief break from sports, starring William Windom

On the “About The Sports Arsenal” page, I wrote that this blog “is intended to be a place for me to post my thoughts about sports, and maybe a few other things from time to time.” Consider this post to be one of those few other things.

I subscribe to Google Alerts about various subjects, including The Citadel. Sometimes alerts for “The Citadel” are actually about the military college; sometimes they aren’t. For example, I get a lot of notices about a theater group in Edmonton, a hedge fund in Chicago, and more than a few stories about fortress-like structures in the Middle East.  There is a broadcasting company that always seems to be in the news because someone is suing it. There are also a bunch of people out there who are a little too serious about video games.

There are also alerts about topics that touch on The Citadel, not as the main focus of an article, but in a tangential fashion at best. This post came about because of one of those alerts.

(Don’t worry, I’ll be ready for football season.)

William Windom, a versatile American character actor, died last week at the age of 88. You may not be familiar with the name, but you would almost certainly recognize the man. Among his credits: a key role in the movie To Kill A Mockingbird; a long-running stint on Murder, She Wrote; and countless other guest appearances on television shows, including memorable roles on Star Trek, The Twilight Zone, and Gunsmoke. Prior to his TV/movie work, Windom had enjoyed an extended career on Broadway. He won an Emmy award for best actor in a comedy series in 1970.

Windom had an eventful life, one that included a sojourn at The Citadel — though not as a cadet.

Windom started his academic career at Williams College, but when World War II broke out he joined the Army.

Before becoming an Army paratrooper in World War II, he joined the Army Specialized Training Program, under whose auspices he studied at The Citadel, Antioch College and the University of Kentucky.

During the war, with most of the cadets in the armed forces (and the school needing some extra cash), The Citadel worked out a deal with the Army to help train soldiers in various disciplines, with the men housed on campus. Windom was one of those soldiers. This in itself was not unusual, but while reading about Windom’s subsequent academic career I stumbled down an information rabbit hole — for after leaving Kentucky, Windom was not finished with higher ed. In all, he went to six different schools. Those six institutions only added up to “about two years’ worth of education,” according to the actor.

It was his fifth school that caught my attention. During the postwar Allied occupation of France, Windom enrolled in the Biarritz American University.

After the war three overseas universities were established for demobilizing GIs. These schools were temporary in nature, as you might imagine, and were shuttered (as planned) in 1946. One of the three was located in the French resort town of Biarritz. That’s the school Windom decided to attend. He chose wisely. None other than John Dos Passos called the students at Biarritz “the most contented GIs in Europe.”

Much of the resort had been mothballed since the fall of France, when its rich and aristocratic clientele stopped coming. The Americans simply took it over, billeting instructors and students in 300 hotels and villas.

The lowliest privates, accustomed to draughty barrack rooms, slept in soft beds with linen sheets, private bathrooms, hot water and maid service (as many townsfolk were glad of the work the new college brought).

The Hotel du Palais, built by Napoleon III for Empress Eugenie, became a regular college hostel; fine-art students at Villa Rochefoucauld were surprised to find one of Queen Victoria’s inventories in an armoire. Ten professors were billeted in what had been the resort’s top brothel, and were disturbed nightly by former customers. The casino became a library, with bookcases replacing the roulette wheel.

The wearing of uniform[s] was about the only piece of military discipline to be retained at BAU, though soldiers cutting lectures could be summonsed and fined. But there was a sense that this was not just a U.S. campus transplanted on to French soil.

BAU didn’t have any fight songs or school colors. It did feature guest instructors of international fame. Of course, sometimes this came at a cost:

Marlene Dietrich came to lecture on movie acting techniques (and the hapless GI charged with looking after her found himself tasked with sucking her toes to help her sleep).

Windom caught the acting bug at Biarritz, playing the title role in a school production of Shakespeare’s “Richard III”. He returned to the United States and continued his studies at Fordham before beginning his professional career.

An obituary posted in The New York Times included this sentence about his time at Biarritz:

“To be honest, I signed up because I thought it would be an easy touch,” he told The New York Times in an interview for this obituary in 2009, “and we had heard that actresses had round heels.”

Imagine being about 85 years old (or any age, I suppose) and getting a call from the Times about an interview for your eventual obituary. That’s…different.

What does it all mean? Not much, really. For me, it’s just a reminder that the internet can be a very interesting place, full of information, occasionally surprising and/or educational. You click on a link, and then one thing leads to another, and then another, and soon you realize that it’s well past midnight…

Examining the conference realignment rumor mill: is the CAA going to decimate the SoCon?

Let’s take a quick look at the latest wild speculation in the never-ending game of conference musical chairs…

Andy Katz of ESPN had this to say in a blog post on June 18:

CAA commissioner Tom Yeager is actively looking at expansion and, according to Davidson coach Bob McKillop, was on the Charlotte-area campus. But no formal offer was given, and it’s unclear if Davidson would accept since it is comfortable in the Southern Conference. The CAA is also looking at Charleston and, according to sources, Furman and Elon are on a lengthy list. However, Stony Brook makes the most sense if it wants to link up its northern teams with Hofstra.

That’s right, Furman and Elon have now joined the College of Charleston and Davidson as schools being connected to a move to the CAA (along with Stony Brook of the America East). This Katzian nugget in itself wouldn’t have started a Twitter fire, but it was followed a couple of hours later by this tweet:

CAA fans shouldn’t be surprised if Stony Brook, Elon, Charleston, Davidson & Furman ALL join the CAA, per sources

The tweet’s author runs the site CollegeSportsInfo.com; I am not sure how good his sources would be, although I don’t think he’s exactly in the same league with Brett McMurphy. (Then again, who is?)

Nevertheless, the tweet got a lot of play in the world of Twitter and on message boards everywhere.

One thing I want to note in passing, however, is the rather strong “we’re in the America East to stay” vibe coming from Stony Brook’s AD in the Katz story. Of course, it’s not like he’s going to say that Stony Brook can’t wait to ditch its current league for the CAA, but it’s not a non-committal stance, either.

If Furman, Davidson, Elon, and the CofC all left the SoCon, the conference would look like this:

Appalachian State
Georgia Southern
The Citadel
Western Carolina
Chattanooga
Samford
Wofford
UNC-Greensboro (no football)

Considering that both Appalachian State and Georgia Southern want to move to an FBS conference in the near future, it’s obvious that losing all four of those schools (particularly the three private schools, which play football) would seriously hurt the league.

Assuming that any of these rumors have any validity is dangerous, but I can see why CAA commissioner Tom Yeager might be trying to make such a bold play. His problem, from my perspective, is that while the CAA may have a certain appeal to the College of Charleston, one of his two believed main target schools, the current CAA lineup doesn’t appear to  impress Davidson, the other school most observers think is on the primary CAA wishlist.

I wrote about much of that a month ago. I didn’t account for the possibility that the CAA might employ a different kind of strategy — namely, flush out Davidson from the Southern Conference by attempting to decimate that league by inviting other SoCon schools, which would also make the CAA more palatable to Davidson (and to current Colonial member UNC-Wilmington).

Such a grandstand play by the CAA, if successful, would be bad news for The Citadel, which would find itself in a hollowed-out shell of a SoCon, and one that would be difficult to reconstruct in a manner that would be acceptable for the military college. It would be so unsatisfactory that I think The Citadel would have to hope for a (perhaps unlikely) CAA invite of its own, even though that league includes schools as far away as Northeastern (980 miles from Charleston), Hofstra (793 miles), and Drexel (680 miles).

In addition, those schools are much larger than The Citadel (or Furman or Davidson). Drexel has well over 20,000 students (as does fellow CAA member Towson and possible invitee Stony Brook). Northeastern and Hofstra are also bigger, urban schools. None of them have any historic ties to The Citadel.

They don’t have any to Furman, Davidson, or Elon, either — which begs the question, is it really worth it for any/all of those three schools to make such a leap of faith?

Honestly, I don’t think it is, and for that reason I’m just a bit skeptical that such a major move is going to happen.

The CAA does have things that the SoCon currently does not — some immediate cash on hand, a modest TV contract with NBC Sports, and the promise of a new digital network. The last of those might be the most important thing of all in the long run, and is something the Southern Conference needs to develop if it wants to remain relevant.

On the other hand, familiarity matters. So does geography, despite what you may read. Sure, the BCS conferences have occasionally pulled off moves that made little geographic sense, but they made those moves despite that, not because of it. There was enough money being thrown around to overcome such issues.

At the mid-major (or low-major) level, however, that’s not the case. Creating an FCS league that stretches for the better part of 1000 miles would be foolhardy, in my opinion. I could be wrong about that. I’ve been wrong before. It just seems nonsensical, though.

In reading a variety of messageboards, just seeing what ideas/rumors/silliness were out there, a couple of things about Furman were mentioned that interested me, and seemed believable. One suggestion is that FU is institutionally concerned about what would happen to the SoCon if the CofC/Appy/Georgia Southern move. The folks in Greenville want to make sure any replacement school(s) would be acceptable to Furman.

That leads to the second point, which is that Furman wants to be in a league with “like-minded” schools. I am not sure the CAA can offer that to the Paladin faithful. I tend to think that if Furman waits for a couple of years, though, the SoCon may start to more fully resemble that school”s ideal.

All of this discussion may be for nothing, but if there is something to it, Gen. Rosa and Larry Leckonby must be out in front of any potential major movement within the league. This type of conference upheaval could affect athletics at The Citadel for many years to come. Standing pat is not the way to go.

College Football TV Listings 2011, Week 11

This is a list of every game played during week 11 of the college football season involving at least one FBS or FCS school.  All games are listed, televised or not.  For the televised games (only live broadcasts are listed), I include the announcers and sideline analysts/reporters (where applicable).  I put all of it on a Google Documents spreadsheet that can be accessed at the following link:

College Football TV Listings 2011, Week 11

Additional notes:

— I include ESPN3.com games; they are denoted as “ESPN3”.

— I’ve listed the satellite affiliates for the SEC Network “national” game of the week (Kentucky-Vanderbilt) in a comment on the document.  There are numerous local affiliates, a listing of which can be found here:  Link

— The local affiliates for the ACC Network “national” game of the week (N.C. State-Boston College) can be found here:  Link

— The local affiliates for the Big East Network game of the week (Pittsburgh-Louisville) can be found here:  Link

— The local affiliates for the Southland TV game of the week (Northwestern State-Sam Houston State) can be found here:  Link

— The local affiliates for the SoCon Network game of the week (Samford-The Citadel) can be found here:  Link

— The local affiliates for the WAC Network game of the week (Fresno State-New Mexico State) can be found here:  Link

— Also listed on the document in comments are the regional nets carrying the following games:  Marshall-Tulsa, Navy-SMU, and Duke-Virginia.

— There are comments in the document with additional information for several other games.

— ABC/GamePlan coverage maps for the 12:00 pm ET games (Oklahoma State-Texas Tech, West Virginia-Cincinnati) and the ABC/ESPN/GamePlan coverage maps for the 3:30 pm ET games (Texas A&M-Kansas State, Michigan-Illinois, Miami (FL)-Florida State):  Link

— BTN (formerly Big Ten Network) “gamefinder”:  Link

— BCS Standings:  Link

— FCS Coaches Poll:  Link

A lot of the information I used in putting this together came courtesy of Matt Sarzyniak’s alarmingly comprehensive and completely indispensable website College Sports on TV, a must-bookmark for any fan of college sports.  Also to be credited, as always, are the indefatigable information gatherers (and in some cases sports-TV savants) at the 506.com.  I am also assisted on occasion by helpful athletic media relations officials at various schools and conferences.